Understanding Alcohol Ink – Lesson #15 Pens

Do you wonder how markers compare to brushes? What should you look for when investing in markers? Want to see how they can be used?

The is the fifteenth in a series to help you understand why and how Alcohol Inks work. Pens were really profound for me. I work in a realistic style and wanted to add details to my alcohol ink paintings but I didn’t know what would work. I found some wonderful pens that interacted well with the inks for details and for layering and to solve the problem of how to get a good white. In this video I demonstrate several different pens that I use both dark and white and show you how they can work really well with our Alcohol Inks.

Peacock Tree Frog – Neck details with Gray LePen

 

Questions and comments are always welcome.


Here are the prior lessons:

Lesson #1 The Role of the Alcohol

Lesson #2 Proportion Between Alcohol and Dye

Lesson #3 Push and Glide

Lesson #4 Dab with Pinatas

Lesson #5 Dab a Background with Pinata Inks

Lesson #6 Pouring, Applying and the Power of Blending Solution

Lesson #7 Textures Part 1 Cotton Balls,Credit Cards and Coffee Stirrers

Lesson #8 Textures Part 2 Toothbrush, Minimister, Felt and Stamping

Lesson #9 Textures Part 3 Fan, Wisp Brushes, Monoprints & Folded Yupo

Lesson #10 Staining – What stains and is it a good or bad thing?

Lesson #11 Substrates Part 1 and 2

Lesson #12 Brushes

Lesson #13 Markers Part 1

Lesson #14 Markers Part 2

 

 

December 4, 2017

4 responses on "Understanding Alcohol Ink - Lesson #15 Pens"

  1. Thank you, Linda. I’m so happy that these have been helpful to you.

  2. I just watched all the lessons available on YouTube. Thanks so much. I’m new to alcohol arts and have been fudging my way through. You’ve given me valuable info and are a great instructor. Keep creating beautiful art for others to enjoy and sharing your knowledge.

  3. Thank you, Sheryl, for your continuing lessons.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

©2016 Sheryl Williams Art All Rights Reserved.
X
%d bloggers like this: